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BMP Professional Requirements

Alignment with National and International Standards for Meteorologists

The World Meteorological Organization and the National Weather Service have specific educational requirements for aviation forecasters or meteorologists. Not all weather careers will require the same exact courses, so feel free to discuss your career plans with an advisor before beginning any of our programs.

A degree in meteorology or a related natural science may also be necessary to gain employment in a meteorological career (this will depend on employer). Additional math and science courses will most likely be required for employment. All the BOMP courses can be applied toward our undergraduate degree program in Geosciences, which is considered a related natural science field. Our full BS and MS degree programs (e.g. BOMP or AMP) can be modified or tailored to meet these requirements.


Federal Government (e.g.NWS)

Degree: Meteorology, Atmospheric Science or other natural science major that included at least 24 semester hours in meteorology/atmospheric science including:

Federal Requirement MSU Course
6 semester hours in Atmospheric Dynamics (requires calculus pre or corequisite). Met with GR 4823/6823 and GR 4933/6933 Dynamic Meteorology I and II
6 semester hours of analysis and prediction of weather systems (synoptic/mesoscale). Met with GR 4443 and GR 4453 Weather Prediction I and II
(NOTE: While this meets the minimum requirements, students should also complete a synoptic meteorology course GR 4713 or 4733/6733, and a mesoscale course GR 4923/6923 or GR 4963/6963)
3 semester hours of physical meteorology. GR 4623 Physical Meteorology
2 semester hours of remote sensing of the atmosphere and/or instrumentation. GR 4753/6753 Satellite and Radar Meteorology
At least 9 semester hours of course work for a physical science major in any combination of three or more of the following:
  • Physical Hydrology
  • Chemistry
  • Physical Climatology
  • Aeronomy
  • Computer Science
  • Advanced Electricity and Magnetism
  • Statistics
  • Physical Oceanography
  • Radiative Transfer
  • Advanced Thermodynamics
  • Light and Optics
Met through a number of geoscience classes including:
  • GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology
  • GR 4633 Statistical Climatology
  • GR 8453 Quantitative Analysis in Climatology
  • GR 3603 Oceanography
  • GG 8203 Ocean Science
  • GG 3613 Water Resources
  • GG 8613 Hydrology
6 semester hours of physics with at least one course that includes laboratory sessions (requires calculus pre or co-requisite)
3 semester hours of ordinary differential equations.
Must be taken through Mathematics and Physics Departments

(See Jetstream – Online School for Weather for more information)


WMO BIP-M Topics in Atmospheric Sciences

WMO Learning Outcomes MSU Courses That Address It
2.3.1.1 Atmospheric composition, radiation and optical phenomena Met with combination of:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology
  • GR 4933/6933 Dynamic Meteorology II
2.3.1.2 Thermodynamics and cloud physics Met with combination of:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4913 Thermodynamic Meteorology
  • GR 4823/6823 Dynamic Meteorology, and GR 4623 Physical Meteorology
  • GR 4923/6923 Severe Weather and 4713 Synoptic Meteorology
2.3.1.3 Boundary layer meteorology and micrometeorology Partially Met (88%) with:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology or GR 4603/6603 Climatology
  • GR 4623 Physical Meteorology

NOTE: Content on Turbulent flow not met in above classes can be acquired in COMET module on Forecasting Mountain Wave Turbulence.

2.3.1.4 Conventional observations and instrumentation Partially Met (96%) with combination of:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4443/4453 Weather Prediction I and II
2.3.1.5 Remote sensing GR 4753/6753 Satellite and Radar Meteorology
2.3.2.1 Atmospheric dynamics GR 4933/6933 Dynamic Meteorology II
2.3.2.2 Numerical weather prediction GR 4473/6473 Numerical Weather Prediction
2.3.3.1 Mid-latitude and polar weather systems Met with combination of:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4603/6603 Climatology or GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology
  • GR 4713 Synoptic Meteorology
  • GR 4923/6923 Severe Weather
  • GR 4933/6933 Dynamic Meteorology II
2.3.3.2 Tropical weather systems Met with GR 4923/6923 Severe Weather or GR 4943/6943 Tropical Meteorology
2.3.3.3 Mesoscale weather systems Met with combination of:
  • GR 4963/6963 Mesoscale Meteorology
  • GR 4733/6733 Synoptic Meteorology

NOTE: These classes may be substituted for GR 4713 Synoptic Meteorology and GR 4923 Severe Weather.

Partially met (75%) with GR 4923/6923 Severe Weather

2.3.3.4 Weather observing, analysis and diagnosis Partially Met (88%) with:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4473/6473 Numerical Weather Prediction
  • GR 4753/6753 Satellite and Radar Meteorology
  • GR 4923/6923 Severe Weather
2.3.3.5 Weather forecasting GR 4443/4453 Weather Prediction I and II
2.3.3.6 Service delivery Met with a combination of:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4443/4453 Weather Prediction I and II
2.3.4.1 Global circulation, climate and climate services Met with:
  • GR 1604 Weather and Climate
  • GR 4603/6603 Climatology
  • GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology
2.3.4.2 Climate variability and climate change Met with:
  • GR 4613 Applied Climatology
  • GR 4643/6643 Physical Climatology
2.2 Foundation topics in mathematics, physics and complementary subjects WMO requires coursework in
  • Mathematics (Calculus I through Differential Equations)
  • Physics

WMO also requires complementary subject knowledge including basic-level understanding in Oceanography, Hydrology, Geography, Ecology

  • Met with GR 1114 Physical Geography or individual advanced classes.

Basic-level understanding of

  • Geographic Information Systems
  • Programming
  • Written and oral communication

All classes except Math and Physics can be taken online through the Department of Geosciences.

See the Manual on the Implementation of Education and Training Standards in Meteorology and Hydrology, Vol 1 - Meteorology for the full education and training standards publication.


American Meteorological Society Certified Broadcast Meteorologist

1) 24 hours in atmospheric science including:  
a. 12 hours with calculus as pre- or co-req  
Atmospherics Thermodynamics GR 4823/6823 Dynamic Meteorology I
Dynamics GR 4933/6933 Dynamic Meteorology II
Synoptic Meteorology GR 4733/6733 Synoptic Meteorology*
Mesoscale Meteorology GR 4963/6963 Mesoscale Meteorology*
b. 3 hours atmospheric physics GR 4623 Physical Meteorology
c. 3 hours atmospheric measurements or instrumentation GR 4753/6753 Satellite/Radar
d. 3 hours specialty topics GR 4443, 4453 Weather Prediction I or II
  GR 4613 Applied Climatology
  GR 4943/6943 Tropical Met
  GR 8133, 8143 Foundations of Forecasting/Advanced Forecasting
e. 3 hours of a synthesizing experience GR 4640 Internship
  GG 4333 Geowriting
  GR 8573 Research in Applied Met
2) At least 3 semesters of Calculus Must be taken through Department of Mathematics
3) 1 Calculus based Physics course with a lab Must be taken through Physics Department
4) A course covering Earth's climate system GR 4643 Physical Climatology
5) A course with a multi-disciplinary and/or integrative approach to an environmental topic, such as a course on climate change Many of our courses meet this requirement
6) Computer science/programming, statistics, writing or oral communication GIS classes, Statistical Climatology, Geowriting

*GR 4713 Synoptic Meteorology I can be substituted with GR 4733 Synoptic Meteorology, and GR 4923 Severe Weather can be substituted with GR 4963 Mesoscale Meteorology in any online geosciences program.

See the American Meteorological Society for AMS CBM requirements.


National Weather Association Seal of Approval

Image of NWA seal of approval

The BOMP Certificate Program was developed with the aid of the National Weather Association. Their Seal of Approval requires a written test in meteorology and the evaluation of your on-air video tape. In addition, the applicant must be a full member in good standing with the NWA, be currently employed as a commercial on-air weathercaster, and have 2 years full-time or 3-years part-time experience. If you have successfully completed the BOMP curriculum, you should be prepared to do well on the NWA Seal of Approval written exam. For more information about the NWA Seal of Approval, go to the NWA Home Page.

Certificate Requirements

To earn the Certificate in Broadcast and Operational Meteorology, one must complete the following requirements:

  • Complete the 17 courses in the program with grades of "C" or higher.
  • Attend the BMP/OMP Summer Workshop after completion of all courses.
  • Pass a comprehensive exam with a grade of 80% or higher. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to ensure that each student earning the certificate has adequate retention of the concepts covered through the program.

Internship - National Weather Association Seal of Approval

Image of NWA seal of approval

The BMP/OMP Certificate Program was developed with the aid of the National Weather Association. Their Seal of Approval requires a written test in meteorology and the evaluation of your on-air video tape. In addition, the applicant must be a full member in good standing with the NWA, be currently employed as a commercial on-air weathercaster, and have 2 years full-time or 3-years part-time experience. If you have successfully completed the BMP curriculum, you should be prepared to do well on the NWA Seal of Approval written exam. For more information about the NWA Seal of Approval, go to the NWA Home Page.

THIS COURSE IS OPTIONAL The GR 4640-Meteorological Internship course is NOT required for the degree or certificate. The BOMP offers this course to help students who do NOT have a broadcasting background, but would like to obtain some broadcasting experience. Internships can be a very valuable part of a student's training. If you would like a career in television weather and have never been on-air, then we would advise you to do an internship. Internships are developed between you and the Chief Meteorologist at a local station. You will need to select the station where you would like to intern and contact their Chief Meteorologist. You will need to explain to him/her that you are enrolled in the BMP/OMP certificate program at Mississippi State University and that you would like to intern at their station. The exact details (number of hours, job duties, etc.) of the internship are between you and the Chief Meteorologist. However, to receive full credit (3 credit hours), a minimum of 150 hours must be completed during the internship. There are several guidelines that you will need to follow for your internship: The station will need a letter stating you are receiving college credit for the internship. Email Joy Bailey at joy.bailey@msstate.edu with the supervisor's name, station call letters and complete mailing address. To receive college credit (3 credit hours), you must enroll in GR 4640-Meteorological Internship the semester you intend to do the internship. The internship follows the semester time schedule. For instance, an internship in the fall must begin sometime in August and end around the last of November. You may view the semester time schedule on the Academic Calendar. Also, the current tuition rate applies to this class. At the end of the internship, you must write a paper detailing your experience in the internship. **Please note: Registration for the Meteorological Internship course is done while registering for other courses in the semester you intend to do the Internship. There is no special application form for the internship. Paper Requirements are as follows: Include the number of hours/days a week you were involved. The paper should be submitted at least one week before the last day of classes Broadcast and Operational Meteorology Program Attn: Dr. Erik Fraza (E): erik.fraza@msstate.edu (F): 662.325.0425 Include your job duties. Give examples of what you learned. Describe what impact the internship has had (or may have) on your career goals. Include a space on the last page of your paper for comments from the person in-charge of your internship (supervisor). The paper should be 1 1/2 to 2 pages. Your internship supervisor must comment and sign the paper. After the supervisor comments on the paper, he/she must email or fax the paper to our office: Your grade in the course will be based on your paper (demonstrating what you have learned in the internship) and any comments by the person in-charge of the internship. If you have any questions, please send an email to the program coordinator, Joy Bailey, joy.bailey@msstate.edu.